0
PRESERVED IN CONNECTICUT THE STATE WITH THE LOWEST % OF CONSERVED LAND
0
TOTAL NUMBER OF PROTECTED LAND PARCELS

0
TOTAL MILEAGE OF TRAILS PROTECTED AND MAINTAINED FOR PUBLIC USE
0
YEARLY VISITORS THAT ENJOY THE OPEN SPACES WE PROTECT
0
SALT MARSH HABITAT BEING RESTORED
0
PROTECTED BY OPEN SPACES IN OUR LOCAL COMMUNITIES

Featured Events

 

Haskins Lecture

Doug Tallamy: "Restoring the Little Things that Run the World"

Learn about the Aspetuck Land Trust
Green Corridor Initiative below

 
 

PODCAST BELOW

A “Green Corridor” that connects and engages our communities and safeguards our land, wildlife and water resources for future generations in Fairfield, Westport, Weston, Easton, Wilton and Redding. Connect and Preserve Aspetuck Land Trust Open Spaces.

  • Land Protection

  • Land Stewardship

  • Properties at risk scientifically assessed and targeted

  • Homeowner Engagement

Listen to Aspetuck Land Trust President Bill Kraekel and Landowner Engagement Director Mary Ellen Lemay talk with Connoisseur Media's John Voket about Aspetuck Land Trust's visionary Green Corridor Initiative. They are the first interview in the show! Podcast above.

Learn more about the Green Corridor on our Green Corridor Webpage.

 

Featured in Connecticut Magazine!

 
Pollinator Pathway pioneers: Louise Washer, director of the Norwalk River Watershed Association; Donna Merrill, executive director of the Wilton Land Conservation Trust; Mary Ellen Lemay, facilitator for the Hudson to Housatonic Regional Conservation Partnership (H2H), outreach coordinator for the Aspetuck Land Trust and chairman of the Trumbull Conservation Commission; and Kimberly Stoner, who works in the Department of Entomology at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, at Keeler Ridge Meadows.  Photo Credit: Erik Trautmann

Pollinator Pathway pioneers: Louise Washer, director of the Norwalk River Watershed Association; Donna Merrill, executive director of the Wilton Land Conservation Trust; Mary Ellen Lemay, facilitator for the Hudson to Housatonic Regional Conservation Partnership (H2H), outreach coordinator for the Aspetuck Land Trust and chairman of the Trumbull Conservation Commission; and Kimberly Stoner, who works in the Department of Entomology at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, at Keeler Ridge Meadows.

Photo Credit: Erik Trautmann

The August 20th issue of Connecticut Magazine highlights environmental pioneers, including our own Mary Ellen Lemay. “Each town is a stepping stone in the effort to heal and connect our land by increasing biodiversity, starting with some of the smallest and most important creatures that live among us.” says Mary Ellen.

Saving pollinators and the environment is an important and growing movement. Everyone can participate in developing their own link (their own yard).

Join us on November 7th to hear Doug Tallamy talk about “The Little Things that Run the World” at this year’s Haskin’s Lecture Series. Learn more and RSVP here.


Aspetuck Land Trust Model Native Landscape

Earthplace Design.jpg

A garden creation to inspire and educate homeowners. The “Demonstration Garden” will be an example of how to take care of our yards in more sustainable, pollinator friendly ways. Native gardens like this one will increase the variety of native birds and wildlife we see, create a healthy space for children and pets, support water conservation and minimize water pollution.

We thank the Westport Woman’s Club for supporting this project with the 2019 Ruegg Grant and Earthplace in Westport for providing the perfect space.

For more information about this project, including a list of plants being planted, the dates of the installation, the celebration that will be held, and the sponsors. Please visit the Demonstration Garden Webpage.